Developing Children’s Critical Thinking through Creative Arts Exposure: An Application of Ennis’s Super-streamlined Critical Thinking Framework

By Caroline Nilson, Catherine Fetherston and Anne McMurray.

Published by The International Journal of Arts Education

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Published online: July 28, 2014 Free Download

This paper describes how Ennis’s (2010) Super-streamlined Concept of Critical Thinking Framework (SSCCTF) has been used to frame an analysis of critical thinking development, in a study of young children who participated in a community creative arts activity. The SSCCTF provided an ideal guide during the research analysis to identify dispositions and abilities displayed by the children and map them across the framework. The aim of the paper is to explain the evidence of critical thinking dispositions and abilities in this cohort of children and interpret its significance in terms of critical thinking development.

Keywords: Critical Thinking Development, Critical Thinking Framework, Critical Thinking Analysis

The International Journal of Arts Education, Volume 8, Issue 3, December 2014, pp.31-45. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Published online: July 28, 2014 (Article: Electronic (PDF File; 696.174KB)).

Caroline Nilson

Lecturer, School of Health Professions, Division of Nursing and Midwifery, Murdoch University, Mandurah, Western Australia, Australia

Mrs. Caroline Nilson’s professional domain is nursing and midwifery. As a lecturer at Murdoch University School of Nursing and Midwifery, Western Australia, she has taught in the undergraduate bachelor of nursing program and the postgraduate master of midwifery program. Her teaching is supported by thirty years of clinical nursing and midwifery experience. Caroline has developed specific innovative teaching strategies that have been published and presented nationally and internationally. Her teaching philosophy is based on the centrality of the caring relationship. She places a high value on the subjectivity and inter-subjectivity of relationships and considers that "caring for" others begins with "caring about" others. As nursing and midwifery are both an art and a science, Caroline seeks to provide a learning experience that addresses all four attributes of a nurse’s knowledge: personal, aesthetic, empirical, and ethical. It assists nurses and midwives to bring to society and health care their skills, knowledge, and compassion. Critical thinking development and Indigenous health promotion are her key research interests.

Assoc. Prof. Catherine Fetherston

Head of Nursing and Midwifery and Associate Dean Learning and Teaching, School of Health Professions, Division of Nursing and Midwifery, Murdoch University, Mandurah, Western Australia, Australia

Catherine Fetherston is discipline head of nursing and midwifery and sssociate dean of learning and teaching at Murdoch University School of Health Professions. Her special interests are in research methods, quality teaching, and higher degree research supervision. Catherine is also a member of the Murdoch University Human Research Ethics Committee.

Prof. Anne McMurray

Emeritus Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Griffith University, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

Anne McMurray is an emeritus professor of nursing and a member of the Research Centre for Clinical and Community Practice Innovation at Griffith University. She is also an emeritus professor of nursing at Murdoch University, and a fellow of the Royal College of Nursing, Australia, and Sigma Theta Tau International Honour Society.