The Tomsich School of Contemporary Dance

By Lena Ferrufino and Olivier A. Coubard.

Published by The International Journal of Arts Theory and History

Format Price
Article: Print $US10.00
Published online: April 17, 2014 $US5.00

Educational methods are influenced by two opposite conceptions of learning: the application of standards and codes, and the incentive to explore and discover things one’s own way. The former method is based on the observation that there is basically one human anatomical—including brain—organization with a few variations; the latter relies on the idea that all humans are different and capable of learning everything. Between these two approaches, embodied in the Tomsich School of Contemporary Dance, there exists a theoretical, technical, and educational framework that promotes a personal but constrained exploration through movement improvisation, and takes into account one’s own resources and limitations. We suggest that using this framework may develop both motor and cognitive flexibility, and promote self-esteem and social integration for all.

Keywords: Contemporary Dance, Dance Improvisation, Variability, Flexibility

The International Journal of Arts Theory and History, Volume 8, Issue 1, April 2014, pp.23-29. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Published online: April 17, 2014 (Article: Electronic (PDF File; 312.088KB)).

Lena Ferrufino

PhD Student, Groupe de Recherche Apprentissage et Contexte, Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, Paris, France

Biologist (MSc University Mayor San Simon, Cochabamba, Bolivia) and specialized in motor control (MSc University René Descartes and Collège de France, Paris, France), the author is currently a PhD student at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (Paris, France). Dancer, dance professor, choreographer, and dance therapist from the Tomsich Shool of Contemporary Dance in Bolivia, she has worked with children, older adults, and brain-damaged patients.

Dr. Olivier A. Coubard

Lab Head, The Neuropsychological Laboratory CNS-Fed, Paris, France

Neuropsychologist (MSc University Chambéry, France), PhD in cognitive psychology (University René Descartes and Collège de France, Paris, France), DSc in medicine (University Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France), the author is specialized in motor and cognitive control, eye movements, binocular vision, neuropsychological rehabilitation, and aging. He has been founder and head of The Neuropsychological Laboratory CNS-Fed (Paris, France) since 2008.